Arabic Numbers – Arabic numerals -Arabic Beginner Lesson- 44 – Learn Arabic Free Online

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Arabic Numbers – Arabic numerals  -Arabic Beginner Lesson- 44 – Learn Arabic Free Online

Arabic Numbers

The table below shows examples of Arabic numbers. The first and the fifth columns have numbers used in some Arab countries; they’re not of Arabic origins but still used in many places especially copies of the Holy Qur’an …. Nowadays what we call the Arabic numbers are the numbers shown on the columns 2 and 6, which are used by the Arab world as well as the rest of the world.

 

Arabic Numbers

٠

0

sifr

صفر

١

1

wahid

واحد

٢

2

ithnan

إثنان

٣

3

thalatha (th as in bath)

ثلاثة

٤

4

arba’a

أربعة

٥

5

khamsa

خمسة

٦

6

sitta

ستة

٧

7

sab’a

سبعة

٨

8

thamaniya (th in thin)

ثمانية

٩

9

tis’a

تسعة

١٠

10

‘ashra

عشرة

١١

11

ahada ‘ashar

إحدى عشر

١٢

12

ithna ‘ashar

إثنا عشر

١٣

13

thalatha ‘ashar

ثلاثة عشر

١٤

14

arba’a ‘ashar

أربعة عشر

١٥

15

khamsa ‘ashar

خمسة عشر

١٦

16

sitta ‘ashar

ستة عشر

١٧

17

sab’a ‘ashar

سبعة عشر

١٨

18

thamaniya ‘ashar

ثمانية عشر

١٩

19

tis’a ‘ashar

تسعة عشر

٢٠

20

‘ishrun

عشرون

٢١

21

wahed wa-’ishrun

واحد و عشرون

٢٢

22

ithnane wa-’ishrun

إثنان وعشرون

٢٣

23

thalatha wa-’ishrun

ثلاثة و عشرون

٢٤

24

arba’a wa-’ishrun

أربعة و عشرون

٢٥

25

khamsa wa-’ishrun

خمسة و عشرون

٢٦

26

sitta wa-’ishrun

ستة و عشرون

٢٧

27

sab’a wa-’ishrun

سبعة وعشرون

٢٨

28

thamaniya wa-’ishrun

ثمانية و عشرون

٢٩

29

tis’a wa-’ishrun

تسعة و عشرون

٣٠

30

thalathun

ثلاثون

٣١

31

wahid wa-thalathun

واحد و ثلاثون

٤٠

40

arba’un

أربعون

٤٢

42

ithnan wa-arba’un

إثنان و أربعون

٥٠

50

khamsun

خمسون

٥٣

53

thalatha wa-khamsun

ثلاثة و خمسون

٦٠

60

sittun

ستون

٦٤

64

arba’a wa-sittun

أربعة و ستون

٧٠

70

sab’un

سبعون

٧٥

75

khamsa wa-sab’un

خمسة و سبعون

٨٠

80

thamanun

ثمانون

٨٦

86

sitta wa-thamanun

ستة و ثمانون

٩٠

90

tis’un

تسعون

٩٧

97

sab’a wa-tis’un

سبعة و تسعون

١٠٠

100

mi’a

مائة

١٠٠٠

1000

alf

ألف

١٠٠٠٠٠

100000

mi’at alf

مائة ألف

٢٠٠٠

2000

alfain

ألفين

١٠٠٠٠٠٠٠

10000000

Million

مليون

 

 

 

 

 

Forming numbers in Arabic is quite easy, from 13 to 19 you just place a number before ten for example 13 = three ten, instead of thirteen in English, 17 is seven ten in Arabic. From 21 to 99 you just need to reverse the numbers and add (wa- between the two numbers) 36 would be six wa- thirty instead of thirty six (sitta wa-thalathun), (wa means and).

0 is sifr in Arabic, from which the word cipher came. For 11 and 12 they’re irregular, so just remember how to write them by now (11 = ehda ‘ashar, 12 = ithna ‘ashar).

So in general, numbers standing alone are easy to use, or say. The hard part is that numbers 3 to 10 have a unique rule of agreement with nouns known as polarity: A numeral in masculine gender should agree with a feminine referrer and vice versa (thalathatu awlaad = three boys), boys are masculine plural, so the feminine form of number 3 should be used (which is thalathatu, and not thalathu which is the masculine form, the u at the end of numbers is used when a number is followed by another word to make an easy jump to the next word) (thalathu banaat = three girls) banaat = girls, which is feminine plural, therefore a masculine form of number 3 should be used (thalathu). That may sound complicated but once you get used to it, it will not be as hard as it seems now, besides most Arab natives make mistakes or simply don’t care about  matching the gender and the number.

Knowing how to express numbers in Arabic is a basic language lesson. You’re
bound to encounter Arabic numbers in all sorts of settings, including kalaam
khafiif. For example, when you’re talking with someone about the weather,
you need to know your numbers in order to reference the temperature or
understand a reference if the other person makes one. In this section, I introduce
you to the Arabic ‘arqaam (ah-reh-kam; numbers). (The singular form of
‘arqaam is raqm (rah-kem; number).)
Arabic ‘arqaam are part of one of the earliest traditions of number notation.
Even though the Western world’s number system is sometimes referred to as
“Arabic numerals,” actual Arabic ‘arqaam are written differently than the ones
used in the West. One of the most important aspects of Arabic numbers to
keep in mind is that you read them from left to right. That’s right! Even though
you read and write Arabic from right to left, you read and write Arabic numbers
from left to right! Table 4-3 lays out the Arabic ‘arqaam from 0 to 10.
Table 4-3 Arabic Numerals 0–10
Arabic Pronunciation Translation
Sifr seh-fer 0
waaHid wah-eed 1
‘ithnayn eeth-nah-yen 2
thalaatha thah-lah-thah 3
74 Part II: Arabic in Action
Hurray, it’s raining!
One of the happiest times of the year for people
of the Middle East is when the rain comes. After
all, these hot desert countries get very little rainfall.
You will almost never hear anyone complaining
about rain in Arabic — there are no equivalent
expressions for “rain, rain, go away.” Actually, the
opposite is true! There’s a song that farmers,
students, and children sing when the rain starts
falling: ah shta-ta-ta-ta-ta / ‘awlaad al-Harata;
Sabbi, Sabbi, Sabbi / al-’awlad fii qubbi (ahsheh-
tah-tah-tah-tah-tah / ah-ou-lad al-hah-rah-tah;
sah-bee, sah-bee, sah-bee / al-ah-ou-lad fee koobee;
Oh rain, rain, rain, rain, rain / Children of the
plowman; Pour, pour, pour / The children are in the
hood of my jellaba). A jellaba is a long, flowing
garment worn by farmers in the Middle East. It
has a big hood in which the farmer puts objects.
Of course, children can’t fit in the hood of the
jellaba, but the hood is big enough that it symbolizes
protection against the rain. This is a happy
song that expresses people’s joy when it rains!
Arabic Pronunciation Translation
‘arba’a ah-reh-bah-ah 4
khamsa khah-meh-sah 5
sitta see-tah 6
sab’a sah-beh-ah 7
thamaaniya thah-mah-nee-yah 8
tis’a tee-seh-ah 9
‘ashra ah-she-rah 10
‘arqaam are important not only for discussing the weather but also for telling
time, asking about prices, and conducting everyday business. Table 4-4 contains
the ‘arqaam from 11 to 20.
Table 4-4 Arabic Numerals 11–20
Arabic Pronunciation Translation
‘iHdaa ‘ashar ee-heh-dah ah-shar 11
‘ithnaa ‘ashar ee-theh-nah ah-shar 12
thalaathata ‘ashar thah-lah-tha-tah ah-shar 13
‘arba’ata ‘ashar ah-reh-bah-ah-tah ah-shar 14
khamsata ‘ashar khah-meh-sah-tah ah-shar 15
sittata ‘ashar see-tah-tah ah-shar 16
sab’ata ‘ashar sah-beh-ah-tah ah-shar 17
thamaaniyata ‘ashar thah-mah-nee-ya-tah ah-shar 18
tis’ata ‘ashar tee-seh-ah-tah ah-shar 19
‘ishreen ee-sheh-reen 20
The ‘arqaam from ‘iHdaa ‘ashar (11) to tis’ata ‘ashar (19) are obtained by
combining a derivative form of the number ‘ashra (10) — specifically ‘ashar
(tenth) — with a derivative form of the singular number. In the case of the
‘arqaam from thalaathata ‘ashar (13) through tis’ata ‘ashar (19), all you do is
add the suffix -ta to the regular number and add the derivative form ‘ashar!
After you’re familiar with this pattern, remembering these ‘arqaam is much
easier.
Chapter 4: Getting to Know You: Making Small Talk 75
Table 4-5 shows the ‘arqaam in increments of 10 from 20 to 100.
Table 4-5 Arabic Numerals 20–100
Arabic Pronunciation Translation
‘ishriin ee-sheh-reen 20
thalaathiin thah-lah-theen 30
‘arba’iin ah-reh-bah-een 40
khamsiin khah-meh-seen 50
sittiin see-teen 60
sab’iin sah-beh-een 70
thamaaniin thah-mah-neen 80
tis’iin tee-seh-een 90
mi’a mee-ah 100
In English, you add the suffix -ty to get thirty, forty, and so on. In Arabic, the
suffix -iin plays that role, as in ‘arba’iin (40) or khamsiin (50).